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The crested Bellbird is our symbol. It is a native Australian bird with a  beautiful and distinctive song that can be heard across long distances. Similarly you can be assured that our excellently-crafted research will have long-lasting impact for your organisation or brand.

 


 

When ‘insight communities’ aren’t right for you

What are insight communities?

Insight communities have been one of the big success stories of the last few years in research. The notion behind them of course is that consumers who have opted into an actively-managed long-term ‘community’ of like-minded consumers will be more engaged and provide more relevant, collaborative and in some cases quicker marketing feedback than would be feasible through more traditional methods such as focus groups and surveys.

All fine and good, except ……

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Marketing Automation: How Human is Your Research?

Guest Author Flex MR is world-leading online market research platform that we like to work with. Here is a blog post from them on the important topic of Marketing Automation

Delivering insights that have impact, resonance and clarity is always paramount for a researcher who needs to demonstrate the value of data analysis and running research studies. Many, many times there has been a lot of excitement in the room when a new piece of technology comes along that advances on that analytical capabilities and perhaps even speeds it up. 

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Communicating survey results fast and slow

The way market researchers have traditionally presented survey data in slide after slide of complex tables and charts can best be described as mind-numbing cruelty. The usual charts we see around are nowhere near as interesting as this one.  It is cruel to clients to impose dull complex charts on them. It is also a pretty ineffective way for our industry to communicate.  In this post, I offer some suggestions based on Fast and Slow Thinking.

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How to tell a story

I have another life, outside of SBR, as a novelist, and my novels are historical fiction*. Recently I gave a workshop on turning fact into fiction at a literary festival in Victoria. As I was working on it, Sue pointed out to me that several of my charts about turning ‘fact’ into compelling fiction are relevant to our research communication – where we try to tell a story.

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