images/blogimages/Bellbird-BLOG-2.jpg
The crested Bellbird is our symbol. It is a native Australian bird with a  beautiful and distinctive song that can be heard across long distances. Similarly you can be assured that our excellently-crafted research will have long-lasting impact for your organisation or brand.

 


 

The best ways to use stimulus material

What's the best way to use stimulus material in qual?

Qualitative researchers can use a broad range of stimulus material to get much more out of the discussion.

In fact, we would even go so far as to say that the best focus groups (bulletin board and face to face) use stimulus material as the foundation of the discussion. The stimulus material should be closely related to the thread of the discussion and should be at the core of what participants are talking about, rather than an unrelated or occasional fun activity designed solely for engagement or involvement.

Continue Reading

Six pathways to great qualitative research

We have been thinking how qualitative research has changed since we opened our doors in 1994.

These days, although we still use the traditional qual methods that underpin good practice, we also incorporate the best of the new and emerging methodologies and ways of thinking.  We interview and observe people in more places, doing more things, and talk to them on more topics and in different ways than we used to. We also think differently about what they tell us, because of the great progress that has been made in cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

Continue Reading

How to use semiotics

The Esomar publication RWConnect has been a running a series of articles on semiotics (the RWC Semiotic Serieswritten by some of the world’s leading commercial semioticians. They have described the work they have been doing and its relevance to marketers. It certainly shows that semiotics is alive and well across Europe, in the UK and USA.

Continue Reading

Are we wasting the uniquely human gift of language?

Over the last few years, I have attended many conferences and read lots of blogs from people who do not want research participants to talk. These writers and speakers (oh the irony!) say that researchers cannot ask people what they are thinking, because people don’t know what their unconscious or non-conscious minds are doing.  

Continue Reading

The language of emoji

Ever the language-obsessed researcher, I spent some of my summer break studying the language of emoji! It seems to me to be a useful skill for researchers to learn how emojis are used and how we should interpret them.

Continue Reading


Get in touch